Gospel & Universe

Systems of Hope

❧ This page suggests that the Classical Age shift from a dismal to a positive afterlife seems to have been influenced by Egypt ❧

From Dread to Hope - Western Isles

From Dread to Hope

Exactly why or when the grim vision of the afterlife changed north of Egypt is a matter of debate for scholars of the early Classical world. Yet it's not hard to see how the more hopeful Egyptian type of afterlife system would supply people with greater philosophical meaning and greater moral incentive. Whether or not the Egyptian view influenced the Persians or the later Mesopotamians, Hebrews, and Greeks, it seems that something like it was adopted sometime in the first millennium BC.

From the Egyptian Museum in Turin (photo RYC)

From the Egyptian Museum in Turin (photo RYC)

It seems more than likely that the specific idea of an afterlife land of the blessed was influenced by the positive afterlife scenarios in Egypt or Persia. In Egyptian terms, if your heart is light you'll go to a lush garden. If your heart is heavy and it weighs down the scales, then your soul will be thrown into flames. This is an ingenious scenario, since it leaves the world brighter each time: good people continue to exist, while evil people are erased from the face of the universe. Dark and nasty places like Hell are not required. There are no endless prison riots or gnashing of teeth.

The Weighing of the Scales, from the  Book of the Dead of Aaneru , Thebes, c. 1070-946 BC, in the Egyptian Museum, Turin (photo RYC)

The Weighing of the Scales, from the Book of the Dead of Aaneru, Thebes, c. 1070-946 BC, in the Egyptian Museum, Turin (photo RYC)

The Persians may also have had an influence on the positive afterlife scenarios that developed in the late Classical period and that provided Judaism and Christianity with something far more motivational than the grim quarter-life scenarios envisioned by the Mesopotamians. As I note in Currents of Christianity (in Gospel & Universe; Religion: Many Tribes), Zoroastrianism contains a supreme Being, free will, the notion that you sow what you reap, an afterlife journey (over a bridge) at which point the soul is judged, and the belief that everyone will eventually be redeemed from their sins. The influence of Persian thought isn't clear in the Bible however, despite the Persians being held in much higher regard than the Babylonians, largely because in 538 BC the Persian king Cyrus the Great issued a decree that liberated the Jewish people from their 'Babylonian captivity.'

From the  Book of the Dead of Nebhepet , Thebes, c. 1070-946 BC, in the Egyptian Museum, Turin (photo RYC)

From the Book of the Dead of Nebhepet, Thebes, c. 1070-946 BC, in the Egyptian Museum, Turin (photo RYC)

Detail from Sogdian-Zoroastrian Funerary Couch from China at Miho Museum, Japan.The images purport to show a soul crossing the chinvat bridge, a priest and fire, and the sagdid dog -- from http://www.heritageinstitute.com/zoroastrianism/sugd/trade.htm#panels

Detail from Sogdian-Zoroastrian Funerary Couch from China at Miho Museum, Japan.The images purport to show a soul crossing the chinvat bridge, a priest and fire, and the sagdid dog -- from http://www.heritageinstitute.com/zoroastrianism/sugd/trade.htm#panels

 

Western Isles

In the previous fictional section Final Judgments Moe grudgingly admired the positive afterlife of the Egyptians. Here, I'd like to touch on the transition from hopelessness to hope in the epics of Greece and Italy -- two traditions that most obviously influence the Judaeo-Christian tradition.

In Homer's Iliad, death seems a bleak prospect, as Anthony Edwards notes in "Achilles in the Underground" (1985):

Certainly Achilles' fate in the Iliad conforms to its view of death generally: such forms of immortality as the apotheosis of mortals, worship as a cult hero, or translation to a White Island or Elysian Plain are passed over in virtual silence. The heroes of the Iliad look ahead only to Hades' dismal realm.

In the Odyssey (c. 8th C. BC), Odysseus sails westward to the edge of the world and then communicates with a vague swarm of unhappy souls. When Odysseus meets Achilles, the great warrior tells him that he'd gladly swap places with a poor labourer above ground:

How didst thou dare to come down to Hades, where dwell the unheeding dead, the phantoms of men outworn. [...] Nay, seek not to speak soothingly to me of death, glorious Odysseus. I should choose, so I might live on earth, to serve as the hireling of another, of some portionless man whose livelihood was but small, rather than to be lord over all the dead that have perished.  (trans. A.T Murray, 1919)

It's hard to make out clearly the topography of this Greek realm. Perhaps this is because there were different models of the afterlife, reflecting current and earlier models. Edwards notes the link to Mycenaean and Minoan models, although I imagine that the Egyptian might also play a role:

Belief in a realm of Hades was complemented by an alternative land of the blessed, usually an island located at the edges of the earth, where kings and other favored individuals enjoyed a happy eternity. Although it remains unclear just how this eschatology fits into the religious thought of pre-classical Greece, the idea of such an afterlife is generally agreed to go back at least to Minoan-Mycenaean times.

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